Home » The role of the Commission » How does the Commission relate to me?

How does the Commission relate to me?

The daily operations of an isolated farming community, a provincial town, a large urban centre, or our rivers, lakes and harbours rely on good quality services from councils.

The Local Government Commission provides some oversight of these council structures. It is part of the independent machinery of government which helps to uphold the principles of the electoral system.

Local government is expected to deliver, or make arrangements to deliver, a number of core services.

Core council services enable you to rely on fresh drinking water from your tap. They enable disposal of sewerage and storm-water from your home or workplace or school or sports facility.

You should be able to rely on council officers to deal properly with your neighbour’s building consent or a noise complaint about another neighbour. Council services enable you to dispose of your rubbish and recycling, or to walk your dog in relative safety through your neighbourhood.

Other services include public transport of some sort, as well as the provision of public parking spaces and footpaths. Councils provide traffic enforcement, such as getting an abandoned car towed from outside your property.

Council services allow you to borrow books from the library, research your local history at the museum, or use recreation and leisure facilities like a park or swimming pool. Sometimes they include the organisation of a big civic event like a Santa parade or a Guy Fawkes night or a community festival or a major sports tournament.

They include making sure the quality of the environment is maintained and enhanced for future generations.

They include giving opportunities for Māori to contribute to decision-making processes.

Local government is a network of people, agencies and services. It acts on behalf of communities and works with them to decide what local services, facilities and activities will be provided and at what cost.

Ratepayer or resident

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will give you good local government.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will enable democratic local decision-making by and on behalf of communities.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes can deliver good-quality local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions in a cost-effective way, now and into the future.

  • You can ask the Commission to reorganise local government in your area.
  • You can put forward alternative ideas if someone else applies for a reorganisation.
  • You can make submissions if the Commission issues a proposal for reorganisation.
  • You can organise or sign a petition to force a vote on a Commission’s final proposal for reorganisation.

The Commission will resolve your appeals to council on any final reviews of representation arrangements before each election.

You can ask the Commission to establish a community, and with it a community board, in your area.

Local authority

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will give you good local government.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will help local authorities deliver good-quality local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions in a cost-effective way, now and into the future.

Good local government is expected to produce efficiencies and cost savings. It must contribute to productivity improvements for local authorities, households and businesses; as well as simplified planning processes.

  • You can ask the Commission to alter your boundaries.
  • You can ask the Commission to change your status from a district council to a city council.
  • You can ask the Commission to reorganise local government in your area.
  • You can put forward alternative ideas if someone else applies for a reorganisation.
  • You can make submissions if the Commission proposes reorganisation.

The Commission will help you resolve appeals and objections from ratepayers and residents against amended representation reviews.

You can ask the Commission to help resolve other changes to council structures such as land drainage schemes or the transfer of a ward with a neighbouring council.

Business

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will give you good local government.

Good local government is expected to produce efficiencies and cost savings. It must contribute to productivity improvements for local authorities, households and businesses; as well as simplified planning processes.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes can deliver good-quality local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions in a cost-effective way, now and into the future.

  • You can ask the Commission to reorganise local government in your area.
  • You can put forward alternative ideas if someone else applies for a reorganisation.
  • You can make submissions if the Commission proposes reorganisation.
  • You can organise a petition to force a vote on a Commission’s final proposal for reorganisation.

The Commission can help resolve disputes with your local authority over some changes to council structures, such as management of land drainage schemes.

Iwi or hapu

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will give you good local government.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes provide opportunities for Maori to contribute to council decision-making processes.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes will enable democratic local decision-making by and on behalf of communities.

The Commission ensures any changes it makes can deliver good-quality local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions in a cost-effective way, now and into the future.

  • You can ask the Commission to reorganise local government in your area.
  • You can put forward alternative ideas if someone else applies for a reorganisation.
  • You can make submissions if the Commission issues a proposal for reorganisation.
  • You can organise a petition to force a vote on a Commission’s final proposal for reorganisation.

The Commission will resolve your appeals to council on a final review of representation arrangements before each election.